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Interplay of Na+ Balance and Immunobiology of Dendritic Cells

Neubert, Patrick, Schröder, Agnes, Müller, Dominik N. and Jantsch, Jonathan (2019) Interplay of Na+ Balance and Immunobiology of Dendritic Cells. Frontiers in Immunology 10 (599), pp. 1-6.

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Date of publication of this fulltext: 30 Apr 2019 08:48

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Other URL: http://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2019.00599


Abstract

Local Na+ balance emerges as an important factor of tissue microenvironment. On the one hand, immune cells impact on local Na+ levels. On the other hand, Na+ availability is able to influence immune responses. In contrast to macrophages, our knowledge of dendritic cells (DCs) in this state of affair is rather limited. Current evidence suggests that the impact of increased Na+ on DCs is context ...

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Item type:Article
Date:29 March 2019
Institutions:Medicine > Lehrstuhl für Medizinische Mikrobiologie und Hygiene
Projects:Open Access Publizieren (DFG)
Identification Number:
ValueType
10.3389/fimmu.2019.00599DOI
Keywords:Local Na+ balance emerges as an important factor of tissue microenvironment. On the one hand, immune cells impact on local Na+ levels. On the other hand, Na+ availability is able to influence immune responses. In contrast to macrophages, our knowledge of dendritic cells (DCs) in this state of affair is rather limited. Current evidence suggests that the impact of increased Na+ on DCs is context dependent. Moreover, it is conceivable that DC immunobiology might also be influenced by Na+-rich-diet-induced changes of the gut microbiome. Dendritic cells (DCs) represent important sentinel cells that continuously scan their microenvironment and play a key role in inducing immune responses and maintaining immunogenic tolerance [reviewed in (1–3)]. It is accepted that DCs are able to respond to a plethora of proteinaceous, lipid or carbohydrate molecules as well as nucleic acids via specialized receptors and signaling pathways [reviewed in (4–6)]. Recently, however, it emerged that the local Na+ electrolyte abundance impacts on innate and adaptive immune cell function and vice versa [reviewed in (7, 8)].
Dewey Decimal Classification:600 Technology > 610 Medical sciences Medicine
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes, this version has been refereed
Created at the University of Regensburg:Yes
Item ID:40130
Owner only: item control page

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